Locally grown microgreens

Author: Loralie

Microgreens: How to Use Them

Microgreens: How to Use Them

Microgreens have a higher nutrient density compared with mature greens.  To learn more about microgreens in general click here. That’s all well and good but how do you get all the green goodness into your diet?  Adding microgreens to your diet is less about recipes and more […]

Microgreens: How to Harvest and Wash

Microgreens: How to Harvest and Wash

If you are wondering what microgreens are you can get some general information in this post.  You have your micro greens that you’ve either grown or perhaps purchased.  I think the best way to purchase microgreens is as living plants.  As soon as you cut […]

New Genetic Engineering Tool Needs no USDA Approval

New Genetic Engineering Tool Needs no USDA Approval

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There is a new genetic engineering technology called CRISPR that will create foods that do not need to be approved by the USDA.  Here is a sciency article about the technology.  The CRISPR technique deletes or edits gene sequences and since there is no foreign DNA introduced, the USDA has decided that they do not need to approve products created with this technology.

One application of this new technology will be to develop a mushroom that doesn’t turn brown.  You can read more about that here.  Regardless of how you feel about genetically modified food, safe or not, there is another issue to consider.  A mushroom that turns brown is a mushroom that is getting old.  As food ages, it loses nutritional value.  That is why fresh is best and also one of the reasons the local food movement is growing.

A mushroom that doesn’t turn brown (or turns more slowly) is an advantage to the producer and grocer because it will have a longer shelf life.  For me, the consumer, it is a disadvantage because I will no longer be able to judge the freshness of mushrooms based on the color, thus I might be buying older, less nutritious food.

These foods may still be subject of FDA authority, but I can’t imagine the FDA saying no.  What can you do?  This may sound like a broken record, but either grow your own or buy from someone you know and ask a lot of questions.

Get to Know Micro-greens

Get to Know Micro-greens

What are micro-greens?  You aren’t alone if you are asking that question.  Micro-greens are really small versions of plants you already know and love (well even if you don’t love some of their grown up counterparts, you may still love micros).  They are somewhere between a […]

Organic Food-Cheap, Just Ask!

Organic Food-Cheap, Just Ask!

I got 4 dozen of these extra large, organic, brown eggs for .25 a dozen this week!  One of our local grocery stores is very proactive about discounting eggs and dairy that are about to expire.  Expiration dates are really more like suggestions than hard and fast […]

DIY Step-Cheap

DIY Step-Cheap

diy step

We needed a step between the garage door and the patio so we repurposed some things we had on had to make step.  We used a scrap 2×4 to build a box, filled it with dirt, placed 3 stepping stones on top (they don’t show up very well in the photo) and filled in with pea gravel.  I’m happy to report that the step has held up well now for several years.  At some point I may need to add more gravel and eventually the wood will rot but this was a very quick, easy and economical way to meet the need for a step.

Grow a Little Fruit Tree- Book Review

Grow a Little Fruit Tree- Book Review

I just finished reading Grow a Little Fruit Tree by Ann Ralph.  Around our home we have a pear tree, two apple trees, and a plum tree.  Last year I cut down the peach tree (the second one in that spot) that was probably 10 years […]

Bird Song and Battles Round Two-What Would You Do?

Bird Song and Battles Round Two-What Would You Do?

A bird is building a nest in my green house.  Here we go again! Last Spring I battled a moma robin building a nest on my back porch light.  If my shades are up, I can see through one of the house windows into my 4 […]

Something From My Grapevines, Finally!

Something From My Grapevines, Finally!

Before you start celebrating with me I have to confess, I don’t have any grapes!  I think this is the fifth year I’ve had my grapes and I still have never savored the sweet victory of  a ripe grape bursting in my mouth.  I have had a few sour grapes burst in my mouth, yeah, not much of a victory.  It is a good way to see if they are ready yet. The first year I had a real crop (you know, more than a token cluster of grapes here and there) they disappeared magically overnight when they achieved the perfect (I assume) degree of ripeness.  I blame the possums that I could sometimes hear hissing under my window in the early morning darkness while I sipped coffee and read the bible.  I tried various methods to keep the critters away from my grapes and other crops, to no avail.

The next year was so wet that the grapes developed brown rot.  For 5 years I have tended these grape vines, watering, weeding and pruning?

Here is a picture before this year’s pruning:

grapes before prune

Yes, every year I have to go back to the extension publication and read what I am supposed to do, prune 90 percent of canes, prune off the cordons at 3 to 4 feet or when they touch a neighbor grape vine’s cordons, etc. I’m not exactly sure what I’m doing but I do something!

grapes after prune

Maybe I can volunteer at a winery and they can teach me more about pruning grapes and pay me with wine.  In any  case, what is this benefit I’ve finally received for my efforts?

grapevine wreath

Isn’t this a lovely wreath?  Maybe this is my year for grapes, hope springs eternal!

Phenology: The Garden Helper You Might Not Know About

Phenology: The Garden Helper You Might Not Know About

I have a forsythia bush in my yard.  It is always the first plant in my yard to bloom in the spring, followed by the Bradford Pear and then the Red Bud tree. The date of blooming can vary wildly, anywhere from late February to early April. […]